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2020 Annual Conference Poster Presentations

 

Session Title: A Million Reasons To Stay: A Suicide Awareness Program for Residence Halls

Presenter(s):

Amy Broadwater
University of Arkansas

Topic(s):

  • ·         Wellness and Prevention
  • ·         Community College Focus
  • ·         This program is a suicide awareness program for residence halls.

Abstract: A Million Reasons to Stay is a suicide awareness bulletin board program designed to integrate a mental health wellness approach and residence life in a supportive and interactive manner. It culminates in a final project and wrap-up session with students. Participants will be able to identify creative ways to implement this program or create their own passive programs for suicide awareness. This presentation will describe the implementation of this program in residence halls. Residents Assistants are given basic bulletin board kits (an example will be provided) and are asked to put the boards up in their halls. The boards invite students to add their reasons to stay (buffers) and are culturally inclusive. This project promotes visibility and support to students, while correlating with campus wide activities during the month of September. The main objective of the program is to promote connection and identify students at risk. Student's reasons are collected over the entire month, put into a final framed word-art picture, and presented to the residents halls at the wrap-up sessions. The final word-art pictures are a symbol of the students' voices and hope. Photographs of the bulletin boards, wrap-up session flyers, and final project will be provided.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will be able to identify their target audience for a passive suicide awareness program.
  • ·         Participants will be able to identify two creative approaches to reach their target audience.
  • ·         Participants will be able to discuss and identify at least two objectives for implementing this program.

Session Title: Exploring the Impact of Animal Assisted Therapy in Students' Emotion RegulationPoster

Presenter(s):

Brianna Kane
University of Florida

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Animals are seen throughout history alongside mankind as spiritual entities, companions, protectors, and more recently as active agents in counseling. Animal assisted therapy (AAT) has gained momentum in working with children, as well as individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder, examining attachments, sense of belonging and stress reduction. Further research is still needed examining the impact of AAT with older populations. This presentation will examine emotion regulation with college populations, the specific stressors that students face that influence regulation, and the potential that AAT has in improving emotion regulation. Through a review of current literature, the presenter suggests that university counselors, counselors who work with college students, and counselor educators can use animals in identifying and increasing awareness of both positive and negative emotions, as well as increasing a sense of identity and belonging, crucial for this population's development. The correlation seen between current research on animal assistance in emotion identification and awareness, as well as stress reducers, indicates that animals can be a viable treatment option for emotion dysregulation.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Explain the effects that animals have on human physiological reactions.
  • ·         Describe the connection between animals and emotion regulation.
  • ·         Discuss how animal assisted therapy can benefit counseling clients.

Session Title: "Paws to Practice": Adapting an Animal-Assisted Therapy Reading Program to Decrease Anxiety and Increase Confidence in Conversational Speech for International Students at the Fashion Institute of Technology Campus

Presenter(s):

Jen-Mai Wong
Fashion Institute of Technology

Topic(s):

  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: As a cohort, international students are underserved on college campuses and less likely to take part in mental health initiatives (Hwang et al, 2014).  To this point, a student survey conducted in the Fall of 2018 by the FIT International Student Services office indicated that students experienced both notable anxiety and a lack of comfort in their use of English, which in turn appeared to negatively affect their involvement in campus activities.    Given these findings, in the Spring of 2019 the Counseling Center in conjunction with the International Student Services Office, the Language Exchange Program and the Pet Partners organization, developed and piloted a unique campus event – "Paws to Practice".  During this event, traditional animal-assisted therapy reading programming was adapted for use with international students, with the aim of ameliorating students' anxiety in English language use and improving comfort in their practice of conversational English.  Self-report surveys were administered to students participating in the program, to evaluate both changes in anxiety and confidence level within an assigned animal-assisted therapy conversational session.  Results from these initial assessments are presented for review and feedback, along with areas for continued research and programmatic advances in this relatively novel arena of student outreach.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Have an understanding of the research and assessment outcomes of animal-assisted therapy programming at the Fashion Institute of Technology, including areas for continued growth and exploration.
  • ·         Have an increased knowledge of opportunities for dynamic collaborations on college campuses to reach typically underrepresented student populations, and help promote overall student success and retention.

Session Title: A Comparison of College Student-Athletes with ADHD and Nonatheltes with ADHD: Academic Adjustment, Severity, and Complexity

Presenter(s):

Sonja Lund
University of Scranton

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Research and Program Evaluation

Abstract: College student-athletes traditionally experience more stressors than their nonathletic peers due to their dual roles. ADHD causes impairments in executive functioning which can cause additional stress for the college student. The combination of ADHD and student-athlete status may impact academic adjustment, mental health severity, and complexity of college life concerns. Presently, no study has explored how student-athletes with ADHD may compare with nonathletes with ADHD in terms of these elements. The purpose of this study is to address this gap in literature and by analyzing archival data collected from university students across the United States. This study utilized an ex-post facto, survey cross sectional, correlational research design to examine archival data. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance and logistic regression. Results of the study indicated that when compared to student-athlete, nonathletes reported lower levels of academic adjustment, higher levels of severity of mental health concerns, and higher levels of complexity of college life concerns. Implications for college counseling administrators, university and athletic administrators, and students are discussed. Limitations of the study and recommendations for future research are provided.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         By the end of the session participants will be able to define academic adjustment, severity, and complexity and explain how they manifest in the college population.
  • ·         By the end of the session, participants will be able to describe differences between student-athletes with ADHD and nonathletes with ADHD based on the current research study.
  • ·         By the end of the session participants will be able to list at least two implications the current research study has for college counseling professionals.

Session Title: Misperceptions of Mental Health Stigma: Implications for Minority College Students

Presenter(s):

Alyson Pompeo-Fargnoli
Monmouth University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Research and Program Evaluation

Abstract: Despite being vulnerable to mental health problems, college students are a population that is especially influenced by perceptions of peer mental health stigmatization (Quinn, Wilson, MacIntyre, & Tinklin, 2009), a known barrier to seeking mental health services (Komiya, Good, & Sherrod, 2000; Vogel, Wade, & Haake, 2006). Results of this quantitative study revealed that the amount of peer and campus stigma is overestimated by college students. Participant estimates of peer stigma were considerably greater than their own stigma. This study gained a better understanding of the relationships and predictions between perceived and personal stigmas and help-seeking attitudes/intentions. Furthermore, this study measured the experiences of minority college students in an effort to better understand and support diverse students. For example, minority students were less likely to have used counseling services in the past and held higher levels of social desirability. This poster will also discuss interesting findings between race and personal stigma levels along with implications and multicultural considerations for this population. Considerations for clinical and educational use will be presented. Results from this study and over 10 years of professional experience working in the field, will lend to implications and best practices for college counseling clinical and educational/outreach use.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Attendees will learn how stigma affects help-seeking.
  • ·         Attendees will gain a better understanding of the misperception that exists between perceived and actual stigma levels.
  • ·         Attendees will gain a better understanding of how minority college students perceive mental health services
  • ·         Attendees will learn best practices and implications for outreach of minority college students to attend campus counseling services
  • ·         Attendees will gain ideas about how they can work to reduce stigma and increase help-seeking in their own respective areas.

Session Title: College and Climate Change- What Factors Influence Students' Perceptions and Beliefs on a Changing World?

Presenter(s):

Eleanor McCabe

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Other (please explain in "comments" box below)
  • ·         Current events affecting college students

Abstract: Given the increased urgency to address climate change within the next 20-30 years, concerns about the future of our planet remain at the forefront of the younger generations' consciousness. In fact, many of the individuals currently attending college are all but guaranteed to experience severe changes in climate change during their lifetime, but do not currently have the power or resources to alter this course of events. While some college students take an "out of sight, out of mind" approach to combating climate change, others report feelings of helplessness in their ability to make a difference in the outcome. For the latter group, this state of psychological paralysis is leading to increased visits to college counseling centers and existential questions regarding their future decisions (i.e. having children, choosing certain career paths, etc.). This presentation seeks to explore these mounting presenting concerns of college students, as well as to review the current literature regarding college students' perceptions, beliefs, and experiences with climate change. This presentation will also review different interventions and techniques that have proven successful in empowering college students to engage in environmentally responsible behavior within their locus of control.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Which interventions and techniques have been successful in promoting environmentally responsible behavior in college students?
  • ·         What role does identity play in college student's readiness and willingness to combat climate change on the micro-level?

Session Title: Anxiety in Athlete; Not all Worry is the Same

Presenter(s):

Scott Tracy
Kutztown University

katelyn boucher

Nikki Talarico
Kutztown University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice
  • ·         Community College Focus

Abstract: Poster will explain the uniqueness that each sport has in it's relation to anxiety. It will cover sport specific anxieties and interventions that can be used.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Learner will be able to describe how anxiety presents in athletes.
  • ·         Learner will be able to discuss how anxiety differs from sport to sport.
  • ·         Learner will be able to demonstrate interventions to use with college athletes who present with anxiety.

Session Title: About Life: Developing A College Wide Suicide Prevention Campaign for Community College Students

Presenter(s):

Anita Sheridan-Normann
Austin Community College

Janie Wang
Austin Community College

Topic(s):

  • ·         Wellness and Prevention
  • ·         Community College Focus

Abstract: The Center for Collegiate Mental Health 2017 Annual Report indicates, "the lifetime prevalence rates of "threat-to-self" characteristics (non-suicidal self-injury, serious suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts) increased for the seventh year in a row …" (p. 4). Rural communities, veteran populations, and urban areas with low income rates show the greatest increases in suicidal behavior, and community colleges play a unique role serving these populations. As more state governments legislate increasingly robust suicide prevention efforts on college campuses, Austin Community College, which serves 4 counties with 11 campuses, developed About Life, a college wide campaign to decrease stigma about mental health while offering students opportunities to raise awareness about suicide prevention with other students. In addition, this campaign provided data that advocated to college administration, faculty, and staff of the importance of mental health services on campus and increased suicide prevention conversations with campus stakeholders. This presentation will provide information on how About Life was implemented, outcomes from the initiative, and guidance for colleges interested in replicating the model. This presentation will also address challenges multi-site institutions that serve both urban and rural communities face when establishing college wide suicide prevention initiatives, providing practical information on strategies learned.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         1. Describe the unique features of community colleges that influence suicide prevention efforts on campus.
  • ·         2. Analyze how About Life Campaign developed a strategy for addressing community college challenges to suicide prevention and implemented a suicide prevention engagement program with students.
  • ·         3. List ways About Life engaged students, faculty, staff, and community members on the topic of suicide prevention to decrease stigma and increase resource seeking.
  • ·         4. Apply the About Life suicide prevention campaign model developed at Austin Community College for community college settings, multi-site institutions, and other higher education campuses.
  • ·         5. Demonstrate how data from student evaluation surveys of the event advocated for mental health resources on community college campuses and increased stakeholders in students' mental health needs.

Session Title: Disordered Eating and Negative Body Image among Sorority Women

Presenter(s):

Hannah Redigan
Eastern Michigan University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: The lifestyle of a sorority woman often involves several facets that may contribute to the development of negative body image and/or disordered eating. This study examined body image and eating habits among over 100 sorority women and what factors contribute to these eating habits and body image.The components of prevention programs aimed at combating negative body image and eating disorders among sorority women will also be discussed. I presented my literature review on this topic at the 2018 ACCA conference. This presentation, however, incorporates my own research into the issue.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Attendees will be able to see the different ways in which disordered eating may manifest and what may contribute to these behaviors.
  • ·         Attendees will see what contributes to negative body image and what pressures affect sorority women.
  • ·         Attendees will explore a disordered eating prevention program that may be implemented on their campuses.

Session Title: Exploring the Experiences of Transgender College Students Living in On-Campus Housing

Presenter(s):

Myranda Warfield
University of Florida

Brianna Kane
University of Florida

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: The number of transgender identified people is increasing in the United States (Meerwijk & Sevelius, 2017). As a portion of them are entering college, their mental health and emotional well being may be affected when confronting one of their most basics needs, a place to live. Previous researchers have emphasized the importance of providing inclusive and affirmative housing for transgender students on college campuses (Seelman, 2014; Kortegast, 2017). Yet Seelman's (2016) survey found that upwards of 20.8% of transgender students were denied access to their preferred housing on the basis of gender. Due to the nature of gender segregated housing systems on college campuses, these students are face unique barriers to housing accommodations that their cisgender peers do not experience. In this current phenomenological study, we explored the lived experiences of transgender college students living in on-campus housing. Researchers analyze themes and discuss the findings, providing implications for college counselors and college counseling centers.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Analyze and explain current themes and trends of the experiences of current transgender college students living in on-campus housing.
  • ·         Discuss how these themes impact the mental health of transgender college students.
  • ·         Discuss how counselors may apply this knowledge in their practice with transgender students in college counseling from a social justice and advocacy perspective.

Session Title: High-Achieving, Low-Income Black Students' Experiences of Earning Admission to Highly Selective Institutions

Presenter(s):

Nancy Chae
College of William & Mary

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Research and Program Evaluation

Abstract: The purpose of this poster session is to highlight the resiliency and environmental factors that contribute to college readiness for high-achieving, low-income Black students who attend highly selective colleges and universities. Previous research in the fields of school counseling and secondary and higher education have primarily focused on a deficit-based perspective of students who are low-income and racial minorities. Such disadvantages include lack of access to qualified teachers, limited social capital of families, and academic tracking and gate keeping policies that hinder students' entry into academic rigor (Bryant, 2015). Therefore, this research study addresses and contributes to the gap in the research regarding protective factors that promote academic success and college readiness for high-achieving, low-income Black students, as well as how college counselors can increase awareness of these gaps as well as practice and advocate for ways to close the excellence gap.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will learn about the college readiness needs, perspectives, and experiences of high- achieving, low-income African American high school students.
  • ·         Participants will become aware of how to support the college readiness needs of high-achieving African American high school students (and other marginalized student groups) from low-income backgrounds.

Session Title: Supervisees' Perspectives Regarding Ruptures in Clinical Supervision

Presenter(s):

Melissa Morrison
William James College

Topic(s):

  • ·         Clinical Supervision and Training
  • ·         Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine ruptures that occur within the supervisory relationship and to better inform future supervisees of potential ruptures in order to preserve both the supervisory relationship and the quality of the supervisees' therapeutic relationships with clients. Specifically, this study explored the supervisee's perspective of what contributed to the rupture and what ultimately caused the rupture. This study's sample included ten total participants who were 3rd and 4th year students enrolled in a clinical or counseling psychology doctoral program, who had experienced at least two different supervisory experiences during their doctoral training, and reported that a rupture had occurred in at least one of their supervisory relationships. These participants were interviewed and asked the same prompting question asking them to describe their experience of rupture within a clinical supervisory relationship. All participants discussed the meta-theme of communication with regards to being an issue leading to a rupture within the supervisory relationship. Sub-themes varied participant to participant but included the topics of expectations, professionalism, and feedback as areas that led to ruptures within supervision. These topics are explored in greater detail within the discussion of the study.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Examine ruptures that occur within the supervisory relationship from the supervisees' perspectives.
  • ·         Better inform future supervisees of potential ruptures in order to preserve both the supervisory relationship and the quality of the supervisees' therapeutic relationships with clients
  • ·         This study will provide critical information regarding a topic that has not been well studied.
  • ·         Allow supervisors to obtain unique insight into supervisees' perspectives regarding supervision experience with a particular focus on ruptures.
  • ·         Discuss future research regarding this topic.

Session Title: The use of College Programs to Build Resiliency/Coping Skills as College Students Approach Graduation and Life After College

Presenter(s):

Krystol Alpert
Eastern Michigan University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: The transition that graduating college students undergo is an aspect of college student development that is often overlooked in settings of higher education.  This presentation will explore whether there are common senior year challenges that college students face in anticipating graduation.  In addition, past studies on issues that individuals encountered in the years immediately following graduation as well as factors that may have aided them in their transition into work will be included. Preventative efforts, including suggestions for psycho educational programming, are discussed as a way to help college students cope with distressing feelings leading up to graduation as well as foster resilience and adaptability in students so that they are enabled to endure challenges that come with graduating.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will be able to list common difficulties that college students face leading up to and during their post-graduation transition.
  • ·         Participants will be able to use the information presented to help alleviate common issues that college students face as they approach graduation, therefore promoting well being leading up to and beyond graduation.
  • ·         Participants will be able to apply suggestions for building resilience and coping skills in preparing college students for post-educational challenges.

Session Title: Communication, Collaboration & Community: A Move towards Holistic College Counseling

Presenter(s):

Tanupreet Suri
University of New Mexico

Topic(s):

  • ·         Administrative
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: The University Of New Mexico (UNM) serves a large population of students of color who the majority are low income and often are first-generation students. While UNM serves large populations of students of color academically, the student population continues to request more resources in areas of coping, stress reduction, and increased self-efficacy (Bandura, 1997; Chemers, Hu, & Garcia, 2001). The purpose of this study was to better address the needs of students of color on campus and potential lapses in mental health services provided to them. This study conducted a 90-minute qualitative focus group with three cultural center directors (African American, Native American, and Chicano American). Current academic trends show some universities losing as much as 20% of their overall enrollment (Conley, 2019) which ultimately hurts campus funding. The focus group produced themes of community collaboration, the importance of clear communication between departments and on-campus counseling centers, and the move away from formal counseling groups/individual counseling sessions to the inclusion of informal counseling strategies that bring information directly to the student.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will understand how cultural centers play a key role in the long-term success of students of color on campus and their belongingness.
  • ·         Participants will learn how counseling focus groups can inform research studies long term objectives and create realistic outcomes.

Session Title: The Influence of Family Functioning on Social Competence, Social Support, and Mental Health among College Students

Presenter(s):

Sean Newhart
Johns Hopkins University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Research and Program Evaluation

Abstract: There is a multitude of factors that influence college students' mental health. Among such factors, there is limited research on the influence of family functioning, social competence, and social support, respectively, on the mental health of college students. This quantitative research study examined the relationships among the identified variables with a large, random sample of undergraduate students utilizing structural equation modeling. Results indicate that although there were relationships between the study variables, the a priori theoretical model established by the researcher did not fit the data well. Furthermore, less restrictive analyses indicated social competence as the strongest predictor of mental health among participants. Implications for mental health practitioners and researchers are explored in light of the researcher's findings.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Attendees will be able to compare the influence of family functioning, social competence, and social support on the mental well-being and mental health symptoms of college students.
  • ·         Attendees will have the opportunity to assess the extant research on how family systems can impact college students' experience and specifically, their mental health (e.g., well-being and symptomatology), and apply this knowledge to the practice of college
  • ·         Attendees will have the opportunity to critique the research design, methods, and analyses in light of the research findings.
  • ·         Attendees will have the opportunity to describe the findings of the study and their implications for future research and practice in the field of college counseling.

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Announcements

ACCA joins the 4th edition of Health and Well being in Higher Education: A Commitment to Student Success

Through a collaboration of the PAPA Committee and the Diversity and Inclusion Committee a new paper on the Increased Need for Counseling Services has been added to the Resources Page

The HEMHA Distance Counseling Guide has been added to the resources page.

2018-2019 Research Grant Applications are now being accepted.  Follow the link to learn more about ACCA Research Grant Awards

Please note the addition of the College Counseling & Psychological Services Knowledge Base to the resources page.

ACCA Members in the News

Steffanie Grrossman is quoted in Online Counseling article College Students Diet and Mental Health

Janelle Johnson comments on the state of mental services at community colleges.

Janelle Johnson on College Counseling” Psychotherapy.net Interview. Follow the link to read the full interview.

Janelle Johnson is quoted in the Inside Higher Ed article Colleges Use Technology to Help Students Manage Mental Health, October 5, 2018.


Lisa Adams is quoted in the Washington Post article College Students are forming mental-health clubs - and they're making a difference.
June 28, 2018

Lisa Adams is quoted in the Inside Higher Ed article Flawed Judgement in Use of Force Against Students.
April 19, 2018

Lisa Adams is quoted in the Inside Higher Ed article A World Without Depression.
April 3, 2018

Lisa Adams is quoted in the Time article Record Numbers of College Students Are Seeking Treatment for Depression and Anxiety - But Schools Can't Keep Up.
March 19, 2018

Lisa Adams is quoted in the Inside Higher Ed article Moving Away from Charging for Counseling
February 7, 2018

Lisa Adams is quoted in the Inside Higher Ed article Suicide Data
January 11, 2018

Lisa Adams is quoted in the Inside Higher Ed article All by Myself
October 26, 2017

Lisa Adams is quoted in the Inside Higher Ed article Suicide Victims as Art Subjects
October 10, 2017

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