Founded in 1991 | A division of the American Counseling Association


Friday Breakout Sessions

February 28th, 2020

10:30am - 12:00pm Sessions

Session Title: Applying the Structured Peer Supervision Model to Multi-Disciplinary Group Supervision

Presenter(s):

Emily Palmieri
Wake Forest University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Clinical Supervision and Training
  • ·         Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: Clinicians in training often struggle with learning to evaluate themselves and others in meaningful ways for many reasons. In addition, training programs often have trainees at various levels of experiences and professional training backgrounds, including trainees in terminal masters programs and doctoral interns. The Structured Peer Group Supervision Model (SPGS; Borders, 1991) has been used to aide in supervision with peers at varying levels of experience and has been shown to help trainees focus on task development, easing barriers to receiving feedback and enhance clinical skill for consultation. In this breakout session, the SPGS will be discussed in application to psychology doctoral interns with years of experience and counseling masters interns with little experience in the context of an APA accredited program for the purposes of clinical skill and professional development of all interns in addition to supervision development of doctoral psychology trainees.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Attendees will be able to accurately describe the SPGS Model and have a working knowledge of how to apply concepts to training programs.
  • ·         Discuss varying needs of trainees from various disciplines and levels of experience.
  • ·         Describe various tasks and roles that can be used to increase listening and empathy skills, tolerate abiguity, and decrease defensiveness in the clinical observation and feedback process.

Session Title: Beating the Stigma of Mental Illness

Presenter(s):

Patrick Corrigan
Illinois Institute of Technology

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations

Abstract: The stigma of mental illness is among the most significant barriers to student engagement in college counseling services.  Intersectionality described the psychological phenomenon when mental illness stigma interacts with other stigmatized conditions -- those due to ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and income that exacerbates its egregious effects.  In this breakout session, I review the research portfolio that explains the impact of stigma developed through the 20-year NIH-funded research program at the National Consortium for Stigma and Empowerment (P. Corrigan, P.I.), especially as it is related to young adults in colleges and universities.  More importantly, this session will review the extensive literature on effective and ineffective approaches to stigma change.  This includes consideration of the limited effects of mental health education on stigma.  Then, I summarize the substantial literature on the benefits of contact in erasing stigma; i.e., interaction among people who are out with their mental illness and the "public."  The session ends with review of the Honest, Open, Proud program for College students (www.HOPprogram.org ), a brief. peer-led program to help students strategically decide when and how to disclose their mental health experiences.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Distinguish types of stigma: public, self, and label avoidance; ways it interacts with the prejudice and discrimination related to ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and income; all in terms of the college and university student.
  • ·         Describe different ways to change stigma -- protest, education, and contact --as well as their strengths and limitations.
  • ·         Learn about the benefits of strategic disclosure, especially as it plays out in the Honest, Open, Proud Program and its adaptation for college/university students.

Session Title: Changing Minds Changing Lives: An Innovative, Evidence-based Approach to Psychological Wellness in Multicultural Practice

Presenter(s):

Jim Helling
University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Genevieve Chandler
University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Being a college mental health provider is like being a firefighter: Both arrive on the scene after something has gone wrong. This presentation introduces an evidence-based educational and psycho-social intervention, Changing Minds, Changing Lives (CMCL), designed to strengthen resilience competencies among diverse student populations during the transition to college life before many stress-related problems occur. Model theory, design, implementation and research findings are presented in the format of an experiential workshop modeled on a CMCL class session, with opening guided mindfulness practice, a brief presentation on the social ecology and bio-psychology of resilience, prompted free writing and structured sharing of narratives, followed by a closing ritual of reflection. Participants will learn about resilience competencies, experience how to activate those competencies in practice and review mixed-methods outcome research indicating model effectiveness. The 60-minute experiential presentation of the CMCL model will be followed by more detailed examination of qualitative data highlighting multicultural student experiences in the course and mutative factors that allow CMCL to teach skills and foster transformative experiences when facilitators and participants do not share a salient socio-cultural identity. Implications for multicultural college mental health practice at predominantly White institutions will also be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will be able to list core resilience competencies
  • ·         Participants will be able to utilize strengths-based language to explain the continuum of resilience
  • ·         Participants will be able to describe culturally salient mirroring and resonance as mutative factors in multicultural college mental health practice

Session Title: Counseling on demand:  An evaluation of program needs and changes to meet increased request for flexible counseling services.

Presenter(s):

Nichole Proulx-King
Husson University

Joshua Mangin
Husson University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Research and Program Evaluation

Abstract: In college counseling, we often feel like Gumby, pulled in many directions and asked to be flexible in ways that we never expected.  According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (2019), one in five adults living in the United States experience mental illness, and 11 percent of those aged 18-25 consider suicide.  The way we do therapy is rapidly evolving and changing to meet increased demands.  Some counseling programs have adapted by implementing session limits, outsourcing, charging fees for service, delivering one session models, and more.  Others continue to meet the needs of everyone at the expense of counselor self-care.  Like you, our University has been experiencing similar struggles.  We just learned to embrace the needs of college aged Millennials.  Now Generation Z is here, presenting a new set of needs.  As a result, we have been collecting data to identify patterns in how and when students choose to access services.  Results of this data have led to changes in the way we now approach these complex needs.       Come join us in this interactive session to discover new ways to evaluate your own program, create flexibility to address needs, and implement changes without losing the integrity of your services.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will identify gaps in their own programming in order to open access to all students.
  • ·         Participants will discover inventive methods to increase access tailored to their institution's needs.
  • ·         Participants will create an action plan for addressing barriers that students experience.

Session Title: Historical Trauma and the First Nation Student: Using Transactional Analysis as a Restorative Lens

Presenter(s):

Timothy Hunt Hunt
Sandhills Community College

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice

Abstract: This didactic workshop will consist of teaching a segment of Transactional Analysis to help beginning counselors learn how to use TA in their sessions with First Nations students. Participants will be invited to discover how historical trauma is explained within the context of the Ego states.  Participants will evaluate culturally appropriate healing methods to use with First Nations students.  Participants will discover where their positive inner wisdom resides that influences their ability to positively nurture themselves so that they can in turn nurture/teach First Nation students.  The workshop will discuss the Ego States; define historical trauma, and appropriate healing methods that non-Native counselors can use.  This workshop will consist of a lot experiential learning, mindfulness exercises, and lots of fun and laughter.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         List at least 3 ways to use Ego states in work with First Nations clients.
  • ·         Apply at least 3 concepts from TA that can be used in helping First Nation students heal.
  • ·         Use at least 3 (re)parenting interventions that can be used as a part of healing the wounds of the soul in a First Nations student's trauma work plan.

Session Title: Introducing the Clinical Load Index: a new metric for counseling center staffing.

Presenter(s):

Ben Locke
Penn State University

Sharon Mitchell

David Reetz

Topic(s):

  • ·         Administrative
  • ·         Research and Program Evaluation

Abstract: The Clinical Load Index (CLI) was developed to help colleges and universities make more informed decisions about staffing for counseling centers. Development of the CLI was managed by a collaborative working group representing the Center for Collegiate Mental Health (CCMH), the Association of University and Counseling Center Directors (AUCCCCD), and the International Association of Counseling Services (IACS).  Presentation will include key concepts, background, and a walk-through of using the CLI (including online tools).

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Explain the history and problems with prior staffing guidance for mental health / counseling centers
  • ·         Describe the ingredients needed to create a comparable metric and how to calculate the CLI
  • ·         Describe how the distribution of 450 centers was developed
  • ·         Explain how to use the online tools provided by the CLI

Session Title: Media & Technology as a Primary Intervention for Collegiate Recovery and University Counseling

Presenter(s):

Justin Jacques
Penn State College of Medicine

Vikram Surya Chiruvolu
Recovery Counselor at Kolmac Outpatient Recovery Centers

Topic(s):

  • ·         Wellness and Prevention
  • ·         Other (please explain in "comments" box below)

Abstract: As mental health and substance use stigma has decreased (Mental Health and Suicide Survey, 2015) and help seeking behaviors have increased within college populations with the help of technology (Stretton, Spears, Taddeo, & Drennan, 2018), the demand for counseling services has risen substantially in the past decade (Oswalt, Lederer, Chestnut-Steich, Day, C., Halbritter, & Ortiz, D. 2018).  In response, college mental health professionals have had to engage institutional stakeholders for increased resources (Oswalt et al., 2018) for their students who struggle with mental health and substance use disorders.   One essential and cornerstone resource for college counseling centers is collegiate recovery programs.  Well-developed collegiate recovery programs have seen at times over 90% success rates in terms of student graduation and adherence to long-term recovery.  Yet the need for effective collegiate recovery programs also greatly exceeds access and enrollment. Given the gap, one possible solution is the delivery of intensive outpatient and long-term continuing care via mobile & web interventions.  This panel presentation will explore the components of a comprehensive online relapse prevention program.  Including how it is possible to use mobile/web technology and media to expand access and increase effectiveness of collegiate recovery within and outside of college counseling.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         1). Understand the theory of online recovery care: Integrate Recovery Oriented Systems of Care (ROSC) and the Clinical Counseling of Cyberspace theories into a cohesive theory of online recovery care.
  • ·         2). Identify and tailor interventions and resources applicable to your student population: Learn how to assess digital lifestyle to create in-person and mobile/web interventions for individuals and groups in early and in long-term recovery on campus.
  • ·         3). Plan the implementation & improvement of promising approaches: Understand how clinical practice improvement data generated by mobile/web systems can be shared with researchers and applied to innovate care strategies that improve outcomes.
  • ·         4) Discuss how media and technology can become a stable in your counseling center and be adjunctive to your recovery support services and collegiate recovery community.

Session Title: Narratives of Trans College Students Navigating Identity Development: Implications for College Counselors

Presenter(s):

Kellin Cavanaugh
Hobart and William Smith Colleges

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         This is original, qualitative research that I conducted over  2017 - 2018

Abstract: This presentation will discuss a qualitative study conducted by the presenter which utilized a narratological framework to examine how societal gender roles and stereotypes impact the experiences of transgender and gender-diverse college students. In this study, 6 trans and gender diverse participants were interviewed about their experiences navigating their gender identity throughout their lifetime, specifically focusing in on how their experiences in higher education influenced their gender identity development. Four main themes emerged based on participant interviews: Gendered Attributes, Within Group Differences, Identity Development and Experiences in Counseling. Implications for college counselors, counselor training programs and potential campus-wide initiatives will be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Attendees will discuss study results with the presenter for the purpose of being able to better predict and address presenting problems of their current and future trans and gender-diverse clients.
  • ·         Attendees will engage in small group assessment with the assistance of the presenter regarding their respective counseling center's current practices and initiatives for promoting trans and gender-diverse client welfare.
  • ·         Group discussion will promote the attendees' ability to design and implement better-informed practices for trans and gender-diverse students not only within the counseling center setting, but campus wide.

Session Title: Supporting Mental Health on Campus: Why Extending Beyond the Counseling Center Matters

Presenter(s):

Jenny Wagstaff
Campbell University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Administrative
  • ·         Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: Results from the most recent American College Health Association National survey  (2015) indicate that over the past year, 76.1% of all respondents felt overwhelmed with their workload, 54.1% reported feeling very sad, and 29.8% felt so depressed that it was difficult to function. Given this data, it's no surprise that the college counseling profession is experiencing an unprecedented demand for services. Relying solely on counseling centers to address mental health on campus is not only insufficient but impractical. Campuses must make a shift and expand their priorities to manage the increased demand for mental health services. This breakout session will be facilitated in a round-table fashion and will provide attendees with a comprehensive plan to address the mental/behavioral health needs of an ever changing student body. The comprehensive plan includes strategies to promote mental health and identifies stakeholders on campus. Attention will be given to recent research that focused on entry-level student-affairs professionals and the key role they should play to ensure that mental health issues are being addressed. The session will conclude with a conversation about the unique position college counselors are in to support these entry-level professionals and how this partnership could help improve mental health on campus.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         By the end of this session participants will be able to describe how college counselors can work with entry-level student affairs professionals to collectively address mental health issues on campus.
  • ·         By the end of this session participants will be able to explain how outreach and primary prevention efforts can reduce the demand for services within counseling centers.
  • ·         By the end of the session, participants will be able to identify best practices on college campuses to address the increased demand for mental health services.


1:30pm - 3:00pm Sessions

Session Title: #OnlineHaters: A Pilot Treatment Approach for Cyberbullies Using VR

Presenter(s):

Susan Breton
Fashion Institute of Technology/State University of New York

Maria Hwang
Fashion Institue of New York

Walter Kerner
Fashion Institute of New York

Patricia Krakow
Fashion Institute of New York

James Pearce
Fashion Institute of New York

Richard Hoar
Fashion Institute of New York

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention
  • ·         Innovative treatment design incorporating developing technology in virtual reality and assessment using biosensor data (Fitbit).

Abstract: Approximately 60% of college students have been cyberbullied according to a 2018 Pew Research Center report. Cyber aggression and peer harassment can have devastating effects on both the victims and on the larger college campus community. A number of studies have shown that cyber victims often become cyber bullies. While the majority of research and interventions have focused on the victim of cyberbullying and on the role of bystanders, less research has addressed the bullying behavior.

Our pilot project hopes to help fill this gap. An innovative approach to treating cyberbullying on campus is being developed at FIT using several cyberbullying scenarios that are presented to students in a virtual reality setting. The use of VR provides a fully immersive experience that allows for role switching that we believe facilitates improvements in students' perspective taking and empathy development.

Using biosensors (Fitbits), we will monitor changes in heart rate in vivo as the students take part in scripted VR cyberbullying scenarios. Moments of highest arousal will be examined with the students to increase their awareness of how their emotions can influence decision-making and behavior. Pre and post measures of perspective taking, empathy, impulsivity, and social anxiety will be administered and compared.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Attendees will have a greater understanding of the connection between cyberbullying and social relationships, social anxiety and empathy.
  • ·         Attendees will have a basic understanding of the pros and cons of Virtual Reality therapy in treating cyberbullying on campus.
  • ·         Attendees will be able to critically evaluate the presented innovative VR treatment approach for cyber bullies.
  • ·         Attendees will have a clear understanding of how to work with other departments on campus (IT and Computer Science) to develop innovative treatment approaches.

Session Title: Adverse Childhood Experiences: An Unaddressed Public Health Crisis in Higher Education

Presenter(s):

Rebecca Rampe
University of North Carolina Wilmington

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Adverse Childhood experiences impact over 67% of Americans, yet it is estimated that less than 15% of American Healthcare providers assess for ACEs despite the significant health impact that ACEs can have on a person's treatment. ACEs increase people's likelihood to experience seven out of the top ten leading causes of death in the United States. Within the college population, studies have found that ACEs lead to higher levels of depression and ADHD with an increase in drug and alcohol use. ACES are universal, yet often overlooked and/or assumed to be attached to an oppressed identity. Given the wide reaching impact of ACEs, University Counseling Centers should consider utilizing an ACEs screening in order to provide education to students/campus community, inform outreach programming, and treat a person holistically. Current research indicates a need for ACEs to be considered in compassion and resiliency informed practices and care on college campuses. This presentation will review ACEs, there impact on student health behaviors, the ACEs assessment measures, and the implications for UCC professionals.  The presenter will share ACEs data collected by the UNCWCC, how this data is used in treatment/training on campus, and how it has informed clinical services and outreach programming offered.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will define ACEs and discuss ACEs influence on health behaviors in college
  • ·         Participants will learn about utilization of ACEs data within UNCW programming and campus trainings
  • ·         Participants will generate personal ideas on incorporating ACEs into UCC services/assessment

Session Title: Big Five Personality, depression, and anxiety: Tests of a social support mediation model in an LGBTQ+ college student sample

Presenter(s):

Kristian Robinson
Doctoral Student at Virginia Commonwealth University

Autumn Randell
PhD Education - Counselor Education and Supervision (Virginia Commonwealth University)

Philip Gnilka
Virginia Commonwealth University

Amy Sarcinella
PhD Education - Counselor Education and Supervision (Virginia Commonwealth University)

Kenneth Johnson
M.Ed Student - Counselor Education - School Counseling (Virginia Commonwealth University)

Amber Livingston
M.Ed Student - Counselor Education- College Counseling and Student Affairs

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Research and Program Evaluation

Abstract: The purpose of this session is to explore if social support mediates the relationship between the Big Five Personality Traits and two outcomes: depression and anxiety among a large LGBTQ+ college student sample. LGBTQ+ college students have been identified as being at greater risk for depressive and anxious symptoms in comparison to their cis-gendered and/or heterosexual students. Though there has been previous research on how a couple of these variables interact, there is currently a gap in the literature in looking at how personality traits and social support come together to impact LGBTQ+ college students' experiences with anxiety and depression. This session will report findings from a research project which collected from hundreds of LGBTQ+ college students. A mediation model, incorporating personality, social support, depression, and anxiety, will be introduced. Implications for college counselors will also be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Attendees will be able to describe the prevalence of mental health issues in LGBTQ+ college students and the impact on their functioning
  • ·         Attendees will discuss the complex relationship between the Big Five Personality Traits, social support and depressive/anxious symptoms among LGBTQ+ college students
  • ·         Attendees will be able to apply the findings of the study to better support the LGBTQ+ college students on their respective campuses

Session Title: Ethical Challenges for College Counseling Centers

Presenter(s):

Dan Jordan
Gwynedd Mercy University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: With the rise in the number of students seeking mental health services on college campuses, there is an increased occurrence of ethical considerations that arise from a variety of situations. Counseling centers face not only the challenges of client treatment, but also ethical considerations of program structure, professional obligations, client behavior, and the intersection with university policies, administration, and federal laws. With resources already stretched, it becomes even more important to be aware of the potential ethical issues, their sources, and how to navigate them.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         This presentation will assist with identifying the potential sources of ethical issues.
  • ·         Participants will be able to predict and assess the ethical issues arising from interacting with campus policies, demands from administration, federal laws, OCR decisions, and the nexus with the ADA and 504.
  • ·         Participants will be able to navigate through complex situations such as conduct issues, direct threat assessments, and school policies.
  • ·         Participants will be able to utilize recommendations for best practices and methods to implement them with university staff and administration.

Session Title: From Mental Health to Mindsets & Mentalities:  A Counseling Approach for the Whole Campus

Presenter(s):

Gary Glass
Oxford College of Emory University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention
  • ·         A key objective of the program is to actually show an integration of these 2 topics.

Abstract: This program integrates the topics of Counseling Theory/Practice with Wellness/Prevention by re-narrating mental health in a manner that allows for greater alignment between counseling session interventions and campus outreach efforts to improve student well-being and thriving.  As struggles to meet demands for individual counseling services continue, interventions that have the broadest impact by incorporating as many agents of change are needed, guided by the wisdom and expertise of counseling professionals.  This framework calls for broadening the counseling relationship to include the campus community as a client, offering interventions that incorporate socio-ecological models of public health approaches, social justice frameworks that deconstruct systemic realities toward promoting empowerment, and change mechanisms of research-supported clinical theories.  Shifting from the dominance of a "mental-health" narrative, this framework articulates unchallenged toxic mindsets and mentalities that can permeate a community, campus, or society. Offering language and concepts that can be employed by campus partners and student leaders, this session will describe contextual and experiential change strategies to community-level interventions to translate high prevalence problems of anxiety and depression into widespread cognitive and social tendencies.  Examples and materials used in single outreach programs, broader campus-wide initiatives, and/or individual counseling sessions, will be shared.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will be able to list at least 3 Mindsets/Mentalities introduced that has been manifest on their campus
  • ·         Participants will be able to articulate an application of the presented Mindsets/Mentalities framework to at least 3 clinical or outreach activities on their campus.
  • ·         Participants will be able to explain how the materials and concepts presented are reflected in at least one evidenced supported clinical theory and practice.

Session Title: Rhode Island School of Design's Training Program: A Training Program Developed from a Social Justice Lens

Presenter(s):

Nikole Barnes
Rhode Island School of Design

Topic(s):

  • ·         Clinical Supervision and Training

Abstract: RISD CAPS is dedicated to the process of training students through the use of a trusting supervisory relationship. We encourage trainees to develop their own individual styles of counseling, with a solid foundation of experience and education to support their own professional growth. Through dialogue and self-reflection, the focus of supervision is not only trainees' clinical work, but also the professional and personal development of the therapist-in-training. All aspects of the training program are designed to facilitate the goals of the training year. Through the seminar and speaker series, all staff reading discussions and in-services, the trainee's knowledge base is broadened in specific topical and theoretical areas relating to brief treatment in a college setting. There is a significant focus on gender and racial identity development, social justice theory and advocacy, ethics and suicide/crisis assessment.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will learn about different methods of developing a didactic and diverse training program to address social justice issues in our work with clients/student.
  • ·         Participants be introduced to different social justice concepts to help developing professionals
  • ·         Participants will have an opportunity to discuss different ideas and network with each other for future program development
  • ·         Participants can engage in meaningful conversations about social justice issues including addressing white privilege, microaggressions, micro interventions and anti blackness critical consciousness raising and activism

Session Title: TBD

Presenter(s):

Brian Banks

Topic(s):

Abstract:

Learning Objectives:


Session Title: The Women of Color Support Group: An Antidote to Racial Battle Fatigue

Presenter(s):

Joy Stephens
Howard Community College

Nyasha Chikowore
Chicago School of Professional Psychology

Daniya Nixon
Towson University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice
  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         This topic could also be linked to community colleges and/or Wellness and Prevention.

Abstract: According to critical race theory, racial battle fatigue is the cumulative result of a race-related stress response to distressing mental and emotional conditions, which  emerge from constantly facing racially dismissive, demeaning, insensitive and/or hostile racial environments and individuals. This phenomenon is common among college students, particularly women of color who are negotiating predominantly White college environments. However, these students may be uncertain how to identify their experiences or seek support. As such, a women of color support group was established to provide an antidote to the unsafe or hostile environments that students may experience within the campus and off campus communities.  The group, which is offered through the campus counseling center, addresses the impact of racial battle fatigue on participants mental and physical health.  In turn, participants are engaged in group screenings, collaborative expectation setting, and ongoing follow up meetings which address concepts like microagressions, racial trauma, colorism, social media, body image and hair.  In addition, each session includes specific attention to self-care and coping, specifically related to the aforementioned concepts.  Support group members are also encouraged to attend monthly outreach events which are designed for women of color within the campus community.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will list key components of the group screening process for the Women of Color Support Group.
  • ·         Participants will analyze the ways in which group participants establish ground rules and maintain emotional safety.
  • ·         Participants will analyze current events with links  to racial battle fatigue, microagressions, and racial trauma.
  • ·         Participants will select specific interventions to use at each stage of group development.
  • ·         Participants will discuss specific strategies for coping and other forms of self care related to racial battle fatigue, microagressions, and racial trauma for each session.


3:30pm - 5:00pm Sessions

Session Title: "The Student is Always Right!" When Clinical Care Becomes Retail Therapy

Presenter(s):

Holly Vanderhoff
SUNY Upstate Medical University

Michael Miller
SUNY Upstate Medical University

Sipho Mbuqe
SUNY Upstate Medical University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice
  • ·         Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: The majority of colleges and universities have adopted a business-driven, customer-oriented approach toward student recruitment and retention amidst a shrinking pool of applicants. Identifying higher education primarily as a business and students as customers may make for successful marketing and maximum profits; however, this approach has been criticized as threatening the academic integrity and educational missions of these institutions and stunting the intellectual growth of students. In parallel, the health care industry has increasingly viewed patients as customers, which has raised similar concerns about the integrity and effectiveness of medical practice.     Student counseling centers find themselves at the unique intersection of these worlds. In this presentation we explore 1) the philosophical and pragmatic roots of the "student/patient as customer" model; 2) the particularly corrosive effect of this model on student mental health services; 3) how students of under-served or marginalized backgrounds may be especially disadvantaged by this model; and 4) how counseling centers can counteract this impact in interactions with students, other divisions, and institutional administration.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Describe the philosophical and practical roots of the student-as-customer model
  • ·         Describe the potential negative impacts of this model on students and on mental health services in the college setting
  • ·         Identify strategies for countering these impacts in the therapeutic interaction, within the counseling center, and in relationships with other university divisions and administration

Session Title: Developing and Piloting a Telemental Health Program at a University Counseling Center

Presenter(s):

Nick Joyce
University of South Florida

Scott Strader
University of South Florida - Tampa Campus

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice
  • ·         Administrative

Abstract: The university of South Florida recently developed and is currently piloting a telemental health program. This program is targeted at distance learners who are not as easily able to access traditional mental health services at our physical counseling center location. This session will detail the development of this program including ethical/legal issues, logistics of implementation, and standards of care for telemental health services. It will also discuss literature and research on online therapy theory and efficacy as well as initial findings from the pilot implementation.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will  identify individuals who are most likely to benefit from telemental health services.
  • ·         Participants will discuss the ethical and legal issues associated with telemental health practice.
  • ·         Participants will discuss the reasonable standards of care related to telemental health practice, including informed consent and risk assessment
  • ·         Participants will identify unique aspects of working in an online space that differ from face to face settings.

Session Title: Identity Development of Becoming a HAES Clinician

Presenter(s):

Emily Palmieri
Wake Forest University

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: The Health at Every Size (HAES; Bacon, 2010) approach to health and wellbeing has gained much momentum in the past several years in college settings and is suggested to be best practice to prevent disordered eating and eating disorders (Humphrey, Clifford & Neyman Morris, 2015). While it is well known that clients and clinicians live in a fat-phobic world full of diet-culture (Bacon & Aphramor, 2014), the vulnerable journey of becoming a weight-neutral provider is less familiar. In this breakout session, attendees will have the opportunity to share and hear stories of struggles, curiosities, and increased awareness of clinicians forming the professional identity of being a HAES clinician both inside and outside of the professional setting. Discussion regarding body diversity, size privilege, and shame resilience will guide the potential formation of a new identity development model as the counseling field continues to advocate for size to be increasingly recognized as a facet of diversity.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Attendees will learn to describe and apply Health at Every Size (HAES) principles.
  • ·         Attendees will discuss and analyze their own personal experiences of shifting paradigms of health away from diet-culture.
  • ·         Attendees will apply HAES concepts to various counseling theories.

Session Title: Implementing a Students of Color Group at a Predominantly White Institution (PWI)

Presenter(s):

Jason Axford
University of South Florida

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice
  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations

Abstract: Race and Ethnicity are social constructs based on phenotypic expression and given subjective meaning through differential treatment and shared identity.  For White Americans seeking bachelor's degrees, the graduation rate was 59.4 percent. For African Americans, there was a significant gender gap in college graduation rates favoring women. The University of South Florida (USF) has been recognized as a top-performing university —number one in the state of Florida and sixth in the nation for eliminating the completion gap between black and white students, according to a report released by The Education Trust (2018), A Look at Black Student Success: Identifying Top and Bottom Performing Institutions. USF Counseling Center's Group Therapy program facilitates a People of Color: Our Voices group, which provides a safe and confidential space for students to share and receive feedback relative to issues that impact minorities at a Predominantly White Institution (PWI). Some of the topics addressed are: Colorism, Discrimination, Racial Profiling and Racism, Minority Representation in Faculty and Staff, Safety and Legal Concerns etc. This session will detail how the USF Counseling Center identified the need for such a group, marketed the group, and developed the structure and curriculum for the group using evidenced based practices.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will discuss the impact of institutional racism on students of color and how this impacts persistence towards graduation.
  • ·         Participants will utilize evidence-based practices to implement a students of color group.
  • ·         Participants will discuss the challenges of different types of universities (size, location, private/public etc.) to starting a group for students of color.

Session Title: Reaching out to international students: A strategic approach in collaboration among campus partners

Presenter(s):

YUKA KATO
NC State University, Counseling Center

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: International students provide cultural, academic, and economic benefits to universities and American society.  Those benefits come with challenges.  International students commonly experience a significant journey through cross-cultural transition processes that may involve examination of personal and cultural identities, loss and development of social support, multi-layered stress, and expansion of coping strategies and culturally relevant social skills.  Social isolation and lack of sense of belonging are common and may contribute to depression, anxiety, or poor academic performance.  International students' underutilization of counseling services has been well documented (Poyrazli, 2015).    A strategic approach to address their unique challenges and collaboration among campus partners is critical.  College counseling centers can play an important role.  The Counseling Center at NC State University has collaborated with campus partners to address these factors that hinder international students from seeking support, including the International Tea Time and a video project.  We still need to expand the quality and quantity of our outreach efforts to international students who may need our support.         In this session, we will examine a strategic approach in collaboration with campus partners.  All professionals will be invited to join an open and dynamic conversation to bring our successes, questions, and challenges to the table.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         To have creative and courageous conversations that promotes strategies to support international students.
  • ·         To demonstrate unique challenges and needs of international students.
  • ·         To identify possible interventions to address international students' challenges and needs and how college counseling centers can collaborate with campus partners.

Session Title: Responding to Crises on a Small College Campus

Presenter(s):

Laurie Scherer
St. Mary's College of Maryland

Emily Lamoreau
St. Mary's College of Maryland

Topic(s):

  • ·         Counseling Theory/Practice
  • ·         Other (please explain in "comments" box below)
  • ·         Crises procedure development and evaluation

Abstract: This presentation will focus on responding to crises on small college campuses. College counseling staff in the United States are reporting an increase in the number and severity of mental health concerns presented at campus counseling centers (Xiao, et. al, 2017). Small campuses with limited resources face unique challenges in how to address this growing demand for services and how to effectively respond to crisis situations that arise. This presentation seeks to explore ways in which these campuses can creatively meet the mental health needs of students despite these challenges, and how college counseling staff can evaluate existing plans or develop a new crisis plan that both meets the mental health needs of students and is effectively communicated to all staff members. The presentation will utilize real-life examples and case studies to explore the current mental health crisis procedures in place on a small college campus in rural Maryland.  Additionally, this presentation will highlight the intersection of social justice and mental health care as explanation for the reported rise in severity presentation and demand of services at college counseling centers.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will be able to describe several creative ways use limited staff and funding to best meet the increasing needs for counseling on college campuses.
  • ·         Participants will be able to evaluate an existing plan or develop a crisis plan that meets student mental health needs and is effectively communicated to all staff members.

Session Title: The Effect of Culturally Competent Counseling Practices with Arab American College Students

Presenter(s):

Souzan Naser
Moraine Valley Community College

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Community College Focus

Abstract: Arab Americans make up a significant percentage of the U.S. population and there has been a significant increase in Arab American students attending colleges. Extensive studies and information on culturally competent practices with the four major racial/ethnic minority groups in the U.S. are commonly found in both undergraduate and graduate areas of study. However, information on counseling Arab Americans is scarce. This timely and relevant session will assist clinicians to explore their level of cultural competency in working with Arab American students. Attendees will gain valuable information on the key socio-politico-cultural-economic features that shape and define this population, the unique challenges Arab Americans face, and their needs and expectations when meeting with a mental health provider. It is important for mental health providers to keep pace with the various factors that this group of students will seek in their counselors for support. The session will afford attendees the opportunity to increase their counseling skill set and strategies when working with this unique group.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Participants will develop a cultural, religious, and political framework for understanding Arab American students.
  • ·         Participants will analyze the contemporary challenges and experiences of the Arab American student, and how that impacts and informs the counseling relationship.
  • ·         Participants will identify culturally-sensitive and appropriate counseling techniques and strategies for working with Arab American students.

Session Title: Two Birds with One Stone: Strategies for Social Justice Advocacy that Simultaneously Support Counselor Self-Care at a College Counseling Center

Presenter(s):

Kai Shin (Josephine) Chu
University of South Florida Counseling Center

Topic(s):

  • ·         Social and Cultural Foundations
  • ·         Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Despite an increase in minority student enrollment in U.S. colleges, disparities in mental health care utilization among college students remain (Hunt, Eisenberg, Lu, & Gathright, 2014). College counseling centers shoulder the responsibility of providing quality counseling services to students, many of whom may otherwise have limited to no access to mental health care. Coupled with the nationwide rise in utilization of college counseling services, it has become critical to interweave social justice efforts and multiculturally affirming practices into the fabric of clinical and training programs, rather than separately adding diversity initiatives that may be disjointed and compete for the finite resources of college counseling centers. This presentation will highlight social justice efforts and strategies in the outreach and consultation program, group therapy program, and pre-doctoral internship program of a college counseling center, aimed at increasing access to counseling services for the underrepresented (e.g., international students and LGBTQ+ students) while enhancing cultural humility among early career clinicians. These strategies are executed within an operational model that supports counselor self-care and protects from burnout.

Learning Objectives:

  • ·         Describe three outreach and liaison strategies that counseling centers can implement to increase access to services for underserved students.
  • ·         List five treatment barriers that are broken down by an informal consultation program (i.e., Let's Talk), and compare its utilization rates to traditional counseling among underrepresented students.
  • ·         Discuss ways to incorporate social justice principles into training in a college counseling center to enhance cultural humility among early career clinicians.
  • ·         Describe an operational model that supports counselor self-care in a college counseling center.


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