Founded in 1991 | A division of the American Counseling Association


Poster Presentations

Counselor leadership in supporting students' career readiness and wellbeing: the development of school family community partnership

Presenter(s):

Na Mi Bang
Indiana UniversityĆ¢€“Purdue University Indianapolis

Topic(s):

  • Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues
  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Given the potential importance of dealing with the career development and wellbeing of students, it appears that counselors need to learn how to develop School-Family-Community (SFC) partnerships to promote students' career development and readiness. In collaboration with family and community members, counselors can exactly identify the needs of students and provide effective counseling service to students in need. The presentation aims to conceptualize key elements and factors of developing and facilitating School-Family-Community (SFC) partnerships and explore the role of counselors.  This presentation will discuss career readiness and wellbeing in counseling from the perspective of School-Family-Community (SFC) collaboration. The presenter will address key concepts, research trends, research outcomes, strategies, and resources of School-Family-Community (SFC) partnerships that counselors can utilize when working with students and clients to support their career development and wellbeing.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will understand and analyze the role of counselors in supporting the career readiness of students
  • Participants will increase their understanding of possible obstacles and useful strategies in developing School-Family-Community (SFC) partnerships in counseling.
  • Participants will identify effective counseling service to promote the wellbeing of students.

An innovative support group for college students with autism spectrum disorder

Presenter(s):

Katherine Feather
UNLV

Tiffany Bordonada
University of Scranton

Julia Maranville

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice
  • Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder that affects the lives of college students in ever-increasing numbers. White et al. (2011) estimated that students enrolled on campus with ASD comprise between 0.7% and 1.9% of their university's undergraduate population with an 80% incompletion rate. Students with ASD typically enter college with comorbid concerns, social and emotional difficulties, learning edges centered around interpersonal skills, low self-esteem, sensory overload challenges, as well as academic concerns (Andererg et al., 2017; Hillier et al., 2018). With universities attempting to meet the needs of this specific population, counseling and disability resource centers on campus are attempting to meet these needs by providing innovative services, such as support groups that target the broad range of challenges individuals with ASD face (Hillier et al., 2018). Therefore, the presentation will highlight the latest research on an effective support group format for students with ASD on college campuses and how to implement a support group that meets the specialized needs of this population and to hopefully, improve retention. Specifically, the presenters will summarize specific content that can be infused into the group, as well as a specific competencies counselors and supervisors must hold before providing services.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will be informed on a support group format, focusing on serving college students on the autism spectrum. A literature review and rationale for such a group will be outlined for the participants.
  • The primary focus will be to educate counselors, supervisors, and educators on the support group for college students with ASD and the specific content that can be infused into the group (e.g., self-advocacy, interpersonal skills, appropriate support, self-care, and executive skills), as well as a facilitation guide will also be presented.
  • Upon completion of the presentation, attendees will obtain and demonstrate a greater understanding of the need for a ASD support group on campus, the roles and competencies counselors must hold when working with students with ASD, and how the established an ASD support group in a counseling setting.

Multidimensional Perfectionism, Active Procrastination, and GPA in an Undergraduate STEM Sample

Presenter(s):

Suzanne Hart
Virginia Commonwealth University

Amber Livingston
Virginia Commonwealth University

J. Mitchell Waters
Virginia Commonwealth University

Philip B. Gnilka
Virginia Commonwealth University

Topic(s):

  • Research and Program Evaluation

Abstract: This poster presentation focuses on the relationship between multidimensional perfectionism, academic procrastination, and GPA among a sample of 279 STEM undergraduate students.  While procrastination and perfectionism have been extensively studied individually, examining the relationship between perfectionism and active procrastination is a more recent endeavor. Perfectionism, which has been traditionally viewed as an irrational and dysfunctional view of self, has been more recently described as both adaptive and maladaptive (Hicks and Wu, 2015). Definitions have varied, but most research seems to demonstrate that maladaptive perfectionism has been connected adverse consequences for mental health, relationships, and academic performance (Rice, et al, 2012). Conversely, adaptive perfectionism, or the striving for high standards, has more positive relationships with life satisfaction and active coping styles. The present study explores if active procrastination mediates or moderates the relationships between two dimensions of perfectionism (adaptive and maladaptive) and GPA among a sample of STEM undergraduate students.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand and identify/define perfectionism and active procrastination
  • Understand the differences in well-being and personal characteristics between individuals with adaptive and maladaptive perfectionism
  • Articulate how active procrastination relates to both forms of perfectionism that influences GPA outcomes among STEM undergraduate students

Helping East Asian International College Students: Focusing on Counselor Experience

Presenter(s):

Hyemi Jang
North Carolina State University

Damaris Bates
North Carolina State University

Topic(s):

  • Counselor Professional Identity and Practice Issues

Abstract: Among the entire international students in the U.S., East Asian international students have accounted for one of the largest populations. In previous researches, they are told to face various difficulties while living in a different country away from their home; those difficulties include acculturative stress such as language barrier and loss of support system or academic stress due to different learning environments and high educational expectations. Despite high levels of stress, it is also known that East Asian international students are reluctant to utilize college counseling services. East Asian cultures stigmatize mental health services, emphasize emotional inner will, and deal with difficulties within their family members. Within the small number of researches regarding this topic, most of them investigate students' counseling needs and their reasons for visiting or not visiting counseling centers. Therefore, this program aims to fill the gap and look into experiences from counselors' points of view: their experience in general, benefits and challenges, perceived competencies, and required resources. This program is not only targeted at broadening the understanding of counselors' experience working with East Asian international students, but also investigating required competencies and resources to provide culturally relevant counseling services for East Asian international college students.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will understand the experiences of college counselors working with East Asian international students.
  • Attendees will learn the components of needed competencies to provide culturally relevant counseling for East Asian international students.
  • Attendees will discuss the types of resources and education that counselors need to better serve East Asian international students.

A campus-based collaboration model for international college students

Presenter(s):

Jeongwoon Jeong
Fort Hays State University

Goeun Na
Hunter College, The City University of New York

Donghun Lee
The State University of New York at Oneonta

Sojeong Nam
Western Michigan University

Jungeun Lee
University of Huston

Topic(s):

  • College Counseling

Abstract: As one of the growing college student populations in the U.S., colleges and universities pay increasing attention to assisting international college students with adjusting their campus environment (Schulte, & Choudaha, 2014). Unlike domestic students, international students tend to experience unique challenges due to cultural differences, language barriers, financial issues, and lack of social support (Zhang & Goodson, 2011), which lead to the increased likelihood to experience mental health symptoms (Mesidor & Sly, 2016). To serve this population better, this presentation aims to introduce a comprehensive model where counseling centers take a lead on creating a campus-based collaboration among counseling centers, counseling programs, international student offices, and community-based organizations to promote international college students' academic adjustment and mental health wellbeing.   Based on the current research with 139 international students and extensive literature review, the presenters will suggest a comprehensive model for collaboration with diverse university organizations that provide a wide range of services capturing the distinct needs of international students. Based on the model, the presenters will discuss strategies and resources for counselors and other related stakeholders to serve the international student population.

Learning Objectives:

  • The audience will learn unique challenges and needs of international college students regarding academic adjustment and mental health well-being in the US.
  • The audience will learn a campus-based collaboration model for international students.
  • The audience will provide ideas and campus-wide resources that college counselors can utilize to support international students.

Exploring the Lived Experiences of Black students at Predominately White Institutions

Presenter(s):

Amber Livingston
Virginia Commonwealth University Counselor Education and Supervision

Abstract: Historically, many institutions, colleges, and universities included have been founded on and embodied archaic beliefs around race and racial identity. Although many years have passed, a consistent theme found in literature is around students' experiences of discrimination and feelings of loneliness, isolation, and inadequacy when attending a PWI. Throughout time, Black students' have been commonly ignored and brushed under the rug, which further exacerbates feelings of inadequacy and lack of sense of belonging. The present research aims to critique the institution of higher education as opposed to critiquing the individual and putting their experiences "under a microscope." Through this qualitative study, universities may develop programs and initiatives to support their students better. Additionally, the study can aid in counselors' and mental health professionals' multicultural competence with supporting Black students at PWI's.

Learning Objectives:

  • Individuals will identify barriers that impede on Black students' sense of belonging at Predominately White Institutions.
  • Individuals will discuss and identify potential programs or initiations to create to better support Black students at Predominately White Institutions.

Exploring the role of social support and multidimensional perfectionism among Black and Latinx college students

Presenter(s):

Amber Livingston
Virginia Commonwealth University

Kristian Robinson
Virginia Commonwealth University

Philip Gnilka
Virginia Commonwealth University

Topic(s):

  • Research and Program Evaluation

Abstract: Perfectionism has been identified as an important risk factor contributing to depression and anxiety among college students. Even so, few studies have explored how two dimensions of perfectionism (i.e., perfectionistic striving and perfectionistic concerns) may be related to various outcomes including social support, depression, and anxiety. The present study investigates the relationships between social support, multidimensional perfectionism, social support, and two outcomes: depression and anxiety among Black and Latinx undergraduate students. The purpose of this study is to extend earlier studies by utilizing a large sample (N = 1,215) of Black and Latinx undergraduate students at an urban large southeast university. Specifically, this study will explore the role of social support has in mediating between the two dimensions of perfectionism and two outcomes: depression and anxiety.  A structural equation model utilizing latent variables was created along with a mediation bootstrap analysis. The results showed that social support was a significant mediator between both forms of perfectionism and the outcomes of depression and anxiety. This study can help with exploration on creating programs to better support students of color as well as mitigating the effects of perfectionistic concerns and students' overall mental health.

Learning Objectives:

  • Individuals will increase understanding of the role social support has between multidimensional perfectionism and depression/anxiety among Black and Latinx college students.
  • Individuals will identify potential programs or initiations to create to better support Black and Latinx college students.

Acculturation stress and international student mental health: What college counselors, supervisors, and staff need to know

Presenter(s):

Lindsay Lundeen
University of Georgia

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice

Abstract: This presentation will provide current research on acculturation stress and mental health outcomes for college counselors to be aware of when counseling international students. This presentation will provide evidence-based practices associated with counseling international students, while also describing how the process of acculturation can impact international student mental health so supervisors can help supervisees think from a culturally sound framework when counseling international students.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will become familiar with the process of acculturation and how acculturation stress can impact international students.
  • Attendees will be able to describe the mental health outcomes associated with acculturation stress.
  • Attendees will gain an understanding of structural supports and ways they can facilitate better mental health outcomes when counseling international students and/or supervising a student through counseling an individual who identifies as an international student.

Promoting the utilization of college counseling services among underserved students

Presenter(s):

Sojeong Nam
Western Michigan University

Donghun Lee
State University of New York at Oneonta

Goeun Na
Hunter College, the City University of New York

Jeongwoon Jeong
Fort Hays State University

Jungeun Lee
University of Houston

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention

Abstract: Since the COVID outbreak, college students have encountered multiple stressors resulting in mental health issues (Son et al., 2020). It is implied that college students would also demonstrate the increased need for mental health services once they are brought back to campus. However, college counseling professionals should note that some groups of college students have underutilized college counseling services despite their mental health needs (D'Amico et al., 2016). This presentation will first focus on student populations (e.g., African Americans, Asian Americans, and International Students) that have been known to underutilize counseling services (Banks, 2020; Guarneri et al., 2019; Hwang et al., 2014). Then we will also present three critical factors that college counseling professionals should address to promote the utilization of college counseling services among the underserved populations: mental health literacy (Wright et al., 2007), public and personal stigma (Eisenberg et al., 2009), and counselors' multicultural counseling competence (Whaley, 2001). This presentation will introduce how the literature has reported these factors as contributing factors to the use of counseling services and discuss how college counseling professionals and counseling centers can incorporate these factors into their practice, training, and research to serve the student populations better.

Learning Objectives:

  • The audience will be able to list the college student populations that may continue to underutilize college counseling services in the post-pandemic era and describe their mental health needs.
  • The audience will identify three critical factors that would promote the utilization of college counseling services among the underserved student populations.
  • The audience will develop practical implications to implement in their practice, training, and research in college counseling.

Reducing Barriers and Increasing Access in a Community College Counseling Center

Presenter(s):

Chelsie Needham
Tallahassee Community College

Katherine Strauss
Tallahassee Community College

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention
  • Community College Focus

Abstract: The dream of increasing access and eliminating wait times seemed a large feat for a small college community counseling center with the staff of two. According to an article that examined how counseling centers meet contemporary student needs, "The methods and quality of service delivery, not administrative structure, lead to providing optimal care to students" (Brunner, 2014). Examining the modalities and methods of delivery through program evaluation and creating diverse therapeutic parameters we were able to reduce wait times from 3 weeks to 1 week. Through a pandemic, limited funding and staffing, utilizing creative design and problem solving allowed for an 12.4% increase in new student access to counseling services. Incorporating a self-help interactive phone application while taking an introspective approach to our therapeutic modalities allowed students to receive holistic treatment. This poster session will examine the various successes and challenges that it took to create higher access and equity for our students.

Learning Objectives:

  • Assess diverse therapeutic methods through program evaluation to increase access for students.
  • Implement therapeutic parameters with limited resources.

The Implementation of a Pilot Program for Student-Athlete Peer Support Groups

Presenter(s):

Anthony Suarez
Valparaiso University

Alexander Rowland
Valparaiso University

Kate Stake
Valparaiso University

Yasmin Ramos
Valparaiso University

Topic(s):

  • Wellness and Prevention
  • Research and Program Evaluation

Abstract: Collegiate student-athletes are a population with unique mental health needs. The barriers for addressing these needs, as well as measures academic institutions can take to provide support, have been well-documented in the literature (see, e.g., Cosh & Tully, 2015; Lopez-Flores et al., 2021). Among several strategies, researchers have focused on the importance of social support to help student-athletes cope with the challenges they face (Hee et al., 2020; Lopez-Flores et al., 2021). The counseling center at a small, Midwestern university, in partnership with faculty from the Clinical Mental Health Counseling graduate program, responded to student-athletes' requests to increase opportunities for social support by organizing peer support groups that focus on mental health. Peer support has been demonstrated in the literature as an effective means of providing knowledge and support among collegiate athletes (Ernst & Kneavel, 2020). The staff organizers trained the group facilitators using Module 3 on effective listening from the Certified Peer Educator training program (NASPA; https://www.naspa.org) and included additional training specific to group facilitation. The purpose of this poster presentation is to highlight details regarding the launch of the peer support pilot program, including preliminary qualitative data from peer facilitators to evaluate the efficacy of the training provided.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe common mental health issues and barriers to treatment among collegiate student-athletes
  • Apply steps to implement peer support group training and facilitation
  • Analyze efficacy of training to identify supplemental trainings and additional support as needed

First Year In-person: A Mixed Methods Needs Assessment to Understand Needs and Lived Experiences of Chinese International Students during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Presenter(s):

Xi Zhang
Vanderbilt University

YIRAN LING
Vanderbilt University, Peabody College

Yuxin Liu
Vanderbilt University

Topic(s):

  • Counseling Theory/Practice

Abstract: COVID-19, travel bans, and the subsequent racial discrimination threw the lives of many Chinese international students into chaos. Many students faced tough choices between deferring and 'Zooming in' from China during 2020-2021. Though most of them were able to come to the U.S. in fall 2021, the missed opportunities of bonding with cohort members and faculty, networking, utilizing campus resources, and internships have made it even more difficult for Chinese International students to acculturate and thrive in the U.S. Surveys and interviews with dozens of Chinese international students revealed several themes. Many students reported greater pressure from family members to go back after graduation due to the ongoing COVID-19 and racism pandemics in the U.S. The rise of nationalism, the collectivistic Chinese culture, and traditional Chinese values also contributed to their stress and sense of uncertainty. Most Chinese international students, however, underutilize campus resources and seldom advocate for themselves. Some students reported that the college counseling and career services offered in universities were not fully ready to accommodate the unique needs of Chinese international students due to language and cultural barriers. It is thus vital to develop multicultural competencies among staff and faculty to better serve Chinese international students.

Learning Objectives:

  • To provide insight into how COVID-19, travel bans, and racial discrimination affected the career development and mental health of Chinese international students
  • To develop knowledge of the needs for mental health and career services for Chinese international students and the perceived gap between those needs and services
  • To raise awareness on developing multicultural competencies specific to Chinese international students

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